News Flash

Clerk / Treasurer

Posted on: October 27, 2021

Shelburne’s Original Lotting Map of 1876

Original Lotting Map 1876

Shelburne’s original lotting map of 1876 is now fully restored, framed, and hanging in the Clerk’s Office! This project is one I have had on my to do list since I was sworn in as Town Clerk on October 11, 2016. And I am thrilled to be able to check this one off my to do list. Attached are a couple of photos.

 

Kofile Preservation in Essex, VT did an amazing job restoring our map.  They were able to remove many of the stains and tape adhesives that were used to hold it together over the years.  And Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery here in Shelburne did a beautiful job framing the map using museum grade preservation materials. The money to cover these expenses comes from our preservation account which is funded by recording fees (not tax payer dollars). To record a document, it costs $15.00 per page. For every $15.00 collected in recording fees, $4.00 is set aside into the preservation fund. When we have saved enough money, we use it to preserve our land records.

 

According to the “The History of Shelburne” ©1963, the boundaries of Shelburne were in dispute for many years. In 1794, the Vermont legislature made many changes in Chittenden County. This was the year Shelburne acquired the very end of Shelburne Point, which was known as “Pottier’s Point” and used to belong to Burlington. In 1848 the boundary line between Shelburne and St. George was finally established.  The Charter of Shelburne clearly stated it shall consist of 23,500 acres. While there were six miles of lake frontage, the unclaimed land narrowed as it ran east from the lake. This accounts for the triangular shape of Shelburne. According to Lisa Mann, Assistant Town Clerk for over 30 years, in 1798, Ebenezer Cobb calculated the metes and bounds to determine there were only 14,272 acres. The 1876 map was drawn by O.S. Spear based on Ebenezer Cobb’s survey. O.S. Spear lived in the farmhouse at 2517 Shelburne Rd just north of the old Sirloin Saloon.  

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